Notice: Undefined index: HTTP_USER_AGENT in /home/wildbody/public_html/wearewildness.com/wp-content/themes/salient/functions.php on line 71
Nature ConnectionPlantsWild Mind

How To Create an Outdoor Meditation Space

By April 18, 2016 No Comments

As spring makes its welcome way into our lives, now is the perfect opportunity to take advantage of the season’s growth and light. Move your meditation practice outside by creating an outdoor meditation space.

Studies show connecting with nature improves your mood. Meditation is good for your mind and body, reducing your stress levels caused by a variety of factors. Meditation allows you to focus on steady breathing, which helps regulate sleep and heart health.

Now combine meditation with nature, and the effects are even more powerful. Creating an outdoor meditation space is an exercise in mindfulness itself. Use these tips to get started.

Look at Your Yard Closely and See Its Potential

Many set out a few potted plants, barbecue and regularly mow their lawns. Are you drawn to a certain tree? Is an area of your yard particularly neglected yet perfect for meditation?

It’s Okay to Keep It Simple

That’s what mindfulness is all about. It’s letting go and centering away from distraction and “too much.” Choose a tree and add:

  • Wind chimes

  • A place to burn incense

  • Crystals

  • Other holistic objects

If you have two trees to tie up a hammock, you’ll be able to meditate on the passing clouds.

It’s Okay to Make It Big, Too

Create an open-air patio or platform, with four posts to represent north, south, east and west. The pergola is the best example found within most gardens. It can be bought or easily built with the right tools and elbow grease. Buy a yurt to practice your meditation within. If you’ll also be practicing yoga, consider this option for a bigger space.

Create a Labyrinth

The winding motion of the labyrinth reminds you of the return to your innermost self. Making your own labyrinth doesn’t have to be complicated. A small winding labyrinth is just as powerful to walk as a larger one. It’s a great form of active meditation.

Add a Small Fountain or Manmade Pond

The sound of running water soothes. If you live in an urban area, it will also dilute the sounds of traffic and noise pollution.

Enclose and Surround Your Space With Plants

The plants act as a partition, signifying the space is special and unique to reaching a state of mindfulness. The plants also enhance your meditation experience.

Consider benefiting nature by creating a sanctuary for butterflies and bees through plant choices. Will it distract you or enhance your meditation?

Choosing long-living perennials like hosta, bee balm, iris, catmint or wisteria will save money over time. Your local arboretum may provide the perfect inspiration. If you feel lost when it comes to plants, hire a landscape artist or personal gardener.

Create a Handmade Altar

Use flat stones that you find on hikes, odd bricks or paving stones to build your altar by hand. As you build, envision the state of mindfulness you will achieve here. How will it feel to meditate in this space?

Many traditions say your altar should face east for the rising sun or north for your “true north.” Face your altar in any direction that feels right. Simple altars are also built to honor the elements. Decorate your altar with crystals, statues, candles and personal items that hold significance for you.

Get in Touch With Nature and Meditate

Our daily lives are filled with stress. Did you know commuting can cause spikes in blood pressure? Or that meditation can ease that tension? It’s time to commit to healing your body and mind.

With the increasing demands in our lives, getting in touch with nature is vital to the mind and body. These ideas will get you started on the way to creating your outdoor meditation space. There is no right or wrong way to do this.

Look at the potential of your yard. Why starve for more serenity, when you can achieve it now?

Author Megan Wild

Megan Wild is a home improvement writer and loves thinking and planning of new ways to improve her home. She catalogs her ideas on her blog, Your Wild Home.

More posts by Megan Wild